Triolet For Laika

Triolet For Laika

Triolet For Laika is a very beautiful and emotional short animated film directed and illustrated by Emory Allen.

It is a moving tribute to the first dog in space based on the poem “Triolet for Laika, First Dog In Space” by Ann Eichler Kolakowski. The animation is by Alicia Reece and the music is by Alec Considine-Mueller.

http://trioletforlaika.com/
http://www.ocularinvasion.com/
https://www.behance.net/ocularinvasion

Emory Allen is an illustrator and designer who creates whimsical characters and custom lettering for clients the world over. Inspired equally by Jim Henson, Herb Lubalin, and Wolverine, his work is the product of an adult that never learned how to stop being a kid. His unique brand of storytelling has been recognized by Adobe, HOW, and The Huffington Post among others. Emory is currently working with the awesome animation and motion graphics team at NEIGHBOR in Minneapolis. Triolet For Laika is his first short film.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laika

Laika (c. 1954 – November 3, 1957) was a Soviet space dog who became one of the first animals in space, and the first animal to orbit the Earth. Laika, a stray dog from the streets of Moscow, was selected to be the occupant of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik 2 that was launched into outer space on November 3, 1957. Laika died within hours from overheating, possibly caused by a failure of the central R-7 sustainer to separate from the payload. The true cause and time of her death were not made public until 2002; instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on day six or, as the Soviet government initially claimed, she was euthanised prior to oxygen depletion. Sputnik 2 was not designed to be retrievable, and Laika had always been intended to die. Due to the overshadowing issue of the Soviet vs. U.S. Space Race, the ethical issues raised by this experiment went largely unaddressed for some time. As newspaper clippings from 1957 show, the press was initially focused on reporting the political perspective, while the health and retrieval—or lack thereof—of Laika only became an issue later.

On April 11, 2008, Russian officials unveiled a monument to Laika. A small monument in her honour was built near the military research facility in Moscow that prepared Laika’s flight to space. It features a dog standing on top of a rocket. She also appears on the Monument to the Conquerors of Space in Moscow.

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